Sex Offender Registry

The sex offender registration system is designed to allow government authorities to track the activities and whereabouts of convicted sex offenders, even those who have done their time in prison. Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom all have sex offender registration systems in place. In the U.S., the sex offender registry may be made available to the public depending on where you live.

Offenders listed on the registry are placed under certain restrictions such as limited or no contact with minors–even their own children, being prohibited from living near a school or daycare, limited or no use of the Internet or being prohibited from owning toys or any items that may interest a minor. Once a sex offender is released from jail, he must register his address and other identifying information with his state’s law enforcement. If he moves out of states or changes his address in-state, he must notify law enforcement.

The Jacob Wetterling Act of 1994

The Jacob Wetterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Registration Act was passed in 1994 to require released sex offenders to register with law enforcement. Sex offenders are also required to verify/update their address on a yearly basis. Sex offenders who are deemed sexual predators by their state are required to verify/update their address quarterly. Sex offender registration is mandatory in all 50 states.

Colorado Law

The following persons must register as sex offenders if:

  • They were convicted on or after July 1, 1991 for unlawful sexual offense, enticement of a child or Internet luring of a child;
  • They were convicted on or after July 1, 1991 in another state or jurisdiction of an offense that would constitute unlawful sexual offense, enticement of a child or Internet luring of a child if it were committed in the state Colorado;
  • They were released on or after July 1, 1991 from Department of Corrections of Colorado or any other state after serving a sentence for unlawful sexual offense, enticement of a child or Internet luring of a child;
  • On or after July 1, 1994, they were convicted of or received a deferred sentence in the state of Colorado or any other state of an offense involving unlawful sexual behavior

A sex offender must register in the jurisdiction where he resides. If he lives within town or city limits, he must register at the police department. If he lives outside town or city limits, he must register at the county sheriff’s department. If he does not yet have a residence, he must register in all jurisdictions. The offender must register under all the names he has ever used and re-register each time he legally changes his name. If he moves, he must cancel his former registration and re-registration at the law enforcement at his new place of residence within five business days.

Persons convicted of the following offenses are required to register every quarter for the rest of their lives:

  • Sexual assault
  • First degree sexual assault
  • Second degree sexual assault
  • Sexual assault on a child
  • Sexual assault on a child by a one in a position of trust
  • Incest
  • Aggravated incest
  • Sexual assault on a client by a psychotherapist
  • Being found to be a sexually violent predator

Failure to register as a sex offender in Colorado is a Class 6 felony for a first offense; a Class 5 felony for a second or subsequent offense. If you have been found in violation of the sex offender registry laws in Colorado, you will need to retain a Colorado criminal defense attorney who can review your case and determine if you have actually committed a violation.